“Dimash’s heart is Kazakh but his voice belongs to the world”  (Alpamys)

I am not sure, even today, just what made me click on a ‘YouTube’ side link that said ‘the best voice in the world’ back in February 2017 except to say that I have been fortunate enough to go to many concerts and have heard some of the world’s leading singers (Pavarotti, Carreras, Domingo, Celine Dion, Adele to name a few) so I guess I was intrigued! I recognised the song ‘Opera 2’ as I had previously heard it sung by Vitas so I did know what to expect but I was still stunned as Dimash transitioned higher than the original version (dare I say, I still believe that he could have gone even higher). However, there were several other things that struck me about this performance – his showmanship and presence on stage, his impish good looks and the reaction of the audience and other contestants (cleverly achieved by the programme with out distracting from the artist’s song).  However, it was the relationship between Dimash and his father Kanat that truly stood out for me. I felt I was witnessing something special. I now recognise that it was Dimash’s openness and ease at showing and expressing his feelings that is exceptional. Watching this Youtube link made me look for other songs by Dimash and I found ‘SOS D’un Terrien en Detresse’, from the first episode of ‘Singer’. This was a completely different experience for me because it was then that I was really struck by the uniqueness, clarity and beauty of his voice. I also had the extraordinary experience of being able to grasp the story without understanding the words and have learnt that this is the power of his vocals when he emotionally ‘lives’ the song. The audience were mesmerised and stunned and all knew they were witnessing something very special.

I then followed Dimash’s performances throughout the ‘Singer’, joined the English-speaking fan groups (something that I have never done before or ever thought I would) as this was the only way to find out more and how I have been able to follow his journey throughout this amazing year.

I have continued to see how powerful music truly is. There are now countless personal accounts from around the world of different songs of his that have touched and healed deep hurts, losses and pain in people’s lives. I have also experienced how one individual can use a gift (most say God-given) to inspire all that is good in people so that different nationalities, faiths, cultures and backgrounds can come together mutually respecting each other with great love and care. Both of these things are remarkable to witness and to be a part of in a world that is so chaotic.

Comments like the following are common:

‘He makes me want to do good things in my life’

‘He has encouraged me to follow my dreams and not give up’

So what is it about Dimash, his personality and character that can bring out the best in people and in turn, bring people together?

We have seen these following words and phrases used about Dimash by the people who know him very well:

‘Kind, gentle, respectful, giving, hard working, innovative, playful, funny, a delicate soul, beauty and grace in one person, self-motivated, strong will power, prayerful, appreciative, thankful, humble, creative, patriotic, educated, happy’.

Having observed him over these past months I have seen all of these qualities and characteristics. I would add ‘patient, observant, caring, dignified, graceful and truly thankful’. It would be easy to say that he is ‘innocent’, certainly child-like but possibly a better word is ‘pure’. I would agree with one of his early teachers, Klara Kazhygaliyeva, when she says he has a ‘beautiful soul’.

‘Dimash’s beautiful and melodic voice seems to be connected with something invisible and pure’.   (Khabar TV)

Is he too good to be true? I’ve worked with thousands of young people and I believe that what you see is genuine. I have never seen the slightest sign of irritation cross his face even when being jostled by hundreds of fans. Instead he smiles, is friendly and handles it all with grace and dignity. In fact, he is the first to notice a ‘Dear’ fall and move to help her, hear a pregnant woman amongst the ‘babble’ ask for an autograph in the crowd and ensure that she has one and shows genuine concern upon hearing of a fan’s broken foot and hugs her! He is also the first to see an elderly person in a crowded airport lounge and immediately jump up to help her to his seat! If there are any negatives in his character then it is possibly his phenomenal work ethic and therefore, his ability to take good care of himself.  There are certainly dangers here but hopefully those closest to him are able to guide and help him. As a 23 year old, he will make mistakes and accepts this. He acknowledges these mistakes by mocking himself eg ‘how can I forget the words of my own song’. He accepts and learns from constructive criticism and sees this as part of learning and maturing as a professional. Dimash also doesn’t fit into a recognised ‘genre’, is experimenting with his vocals and music and is paving the way to a new musical style that he refers to as ‘neo-classicism’. Clearly there will be some ‘glitches’ as he does this and some songs that individuals will prefer more than others. He is his own worst ‘critic’ musically and always feels that he could have done better. However, we now know that he works incredibly hard to put his best work on stage to please his audience and Dears!

Dimash is totally in tune with his feelings and trusts and expresses these easily and readily.

When asked:

               ‘What is most important to you, talent or appearance? You can’t say both’.

He replied:

               ‘How I feel inside’.

 When asked what he misses most from home, he replied:

              ‘Laying with my head on my Mama’s knee and listening to her talk’.

At the Chinese equivalent to ‘Black Friday’, he was asked what he was going to get for himself. He looked bemused so the interviewer re-phrased the question and asked what he would like to get for his parents. He replied:

             ‘I would like always for them to be well and happy’.

It is these qualities of Dimash, together with his unique vocal and musical abilities that are capturing people and bringing them together. I believe he is tapping into the core ‘goodness’ in people’s hearts with values and beliefs that are often missing in today’s society.

One of my favourite Dimash songs is the Kazakh version of ‘Give me Love’. He chose to sing this song as his last on the ‘Singer’ programme. It immediately felt like a prayer to me even though I didn’t, at the time, understand the lyrics:

‘My heart carries a touch of melancholy

Like a moon in a faint light

The ladder of destiny

Please help me go the distance …

Dreams build up the history of life

Each is a peak that humans can hardly reach

I’ve fallen over the the cliff so many times

Yet still stood up and sang aloud …

The light of hope will never fade

I do not fear the difficulties and dangers ahead

No matter where happiness dwells

My singing is always up in the sky …

The refrain that runs between each verse:

Grant me love, my destiny

Grant me love

Grant me love, my destiny

A heart-shaking love

Surround my life with blazing fire

Grant me love

That nobody has ever possessed at any time’.

 

Dimash’s heart and veins flow with love for God, family, his country, music and singing, education and a deep love for people.

Earlier this year, Dimash said the following and I believe this is yet another dream that we are seeing fulfilled:

‘The human soul wants to make the world better and more beautiful and I feel that my dream which is concealed in the depths of my heart aspires to something majestic through my art’.   (Dimash)

Khabar TV’s programme on Dimash concluded in this way:

‘A flawless, precious diamond immersed in the water dungeon;

A flawless, precious diamond only disturbed by the wind rises!’

These words of wise Asan Kaigy (Kazakh XIV poet and philosopher), perfectly describes the world of Dimash.

‘As the wind has blown, millions of people can now see that precious diamond’.

 

 

 

 

Ruth Green

Plymouth, UK